Blog

Kalita Wave Pour Over Tutorial

Posted on September 25, 2014 by Chris Reimer

 

The Kalita Wave is quickly becoming one of the most popular pour over coffee brewing methods, known for its beauty and its flat bottom, which allows for a more even extraction.

It just so happens to be the favorite brewing method of our own David Fasman, GM of Kayak's by Kaldi's Coffee. So we got together with him to show us how it's done. Watch the video above, and follow along with the instructions below.

 

Supplies you'll need:

24g coffee, medium grind

Coffee grinder

Kalita Wave dripper

Kalita filter

Gooseneck pouring kettle

Filtered water at optimal brewing temp of 195 - 205° F

Decanter large enough to brew into

Scale

Timer

 

Instructions:

1. Weigh out 24 grams of Kaldi's Coffee (substitute only in a pinch!). Don't be intimidated by the use of a scale - it actually helps you be more precise when making pour overs. No guesswork!

2. Place the filter in the Kalita Wave, and then place the Kalita Wave on top of the decanter.

3. Rinse the filter with hot water. This allows us to eliminate paper taste when brewing our coffee. (If you don't believe us, take a drink of the water that first passes through the filter.) We're also preheating the Kalita Wave and the decanter.

4. Discard hot water from the decanter, and discard any excess water from the Kalita that may be retained under the filter.

5. Put at least 16 ounces of filtered water, heated to the optimal brewing temperature of 195 - 205° F, in your pouring kettle. You can get water to this temperature by bringing it to a boil, and then letting it sit for 30 seconds to a minute.

6. Grind your coffee using a medium grind setting. It's best to grind recently roasted whole bean coffee, and to do this right before you brew, as you'll be using the freshest coffee possible.

7. Again place the Kalita Wave on top of the decanter.

8. Pour the coffee grounds into the Kalita Wave's filter, and tap the Wave, or gently shake back and forth to flatten out the grounds. This helps to remove air pockets and create a flat surface to work with.

9. Place the Kalita Wave and your decanter on the scale, and tare it out (zero out the scale). This will allow you to measure how much water you use during the brewing process.

10. If you're ready to begin, start your timer and begin pouring water over the coffee grounds. Wet all coffee grounds evenly, and then stop pouring. Use just enough water to fully saturate the grounds.

11. Watch the coffee bloom (bubbles) for about 30-45 seconds, after which the bubbles will stop forming. This is a great chance to take a sniff - it will smell wonderful.

12. After the bloom, slowly and continuously pour in small circles until you reach 400 grams on your scale. Note that some baristas like to "pulse pour," or pour for 10-20 seconds, then stop to take a short break, before beginning to pour again. David doesn't do it this way (and he explains why in the video), but try it both ways and see which pouring method works best for you.

13. Extraction should be complete after 2:30 to 3:00. If it took longer than 3:00, your grind was likely too fine. If extraction took much less time than this, your grind was too coarse. Adjust your settings and try again. (Don't be afraid to keep trying new and different variables).

14. Remove the Kalita Wave from the decanter, and swirl the decanter to ensure coffee integration.

15. Pour into your favorite mug and enjoy!

16. Discard or compost your used coffee grounds.

 

Want to try this at home? Order a Kalita Wave and filters from us and start hand brewing your coffee! 

Posted in David Fasman, hand brew, handbrew, Kalita wave, Kalita wave pour over tutorial, Kalita Wave tutorial, Kayak's, Kayak's by Kaldi's Coffee, pour over, pourover

Chemex Pour Over Tutorial

Posted on September 22, 2014 by Chris Reimer

The Chemex was invented back in 1941 by a German scientist named Peter Schlumbohm, and has changed very little since then. Often considered one of the best-designed products of modern times, you could even call it a work of art - a Chemex is on display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

What makes the Chemex different than other pour over methods? The coffee only comes in contact with the scientifically designed Chemex filters and non-porous glass, and the filter removes most of a coffee's oils. This yields a sediment-free, clean, bright-tasting cup of coffee.

Tony Auger, roaster and quality assurance technician at Kaldi's Coffee, loves brewing with the Chemex, so we asked him to meet us at our Demun cafe to show us how it's done. Watch the video above, and follow along with the instructions below.

 

Supplies you'll need (click item to purchase from our online store):

41g coffee, medium grind

Coffee grinder

Chemex

Chemex filter

Gooseneck pouring kettle

Filtered water at optimal brewing temp of 195 - 205° F

Scale

Timer

 

Instructions:

1. Weigh out 41 grams of Kaldi's Coffee (substitute only in a pinch!). Don't be intimidated by the use of a scale - it actually helps you be more precise when making pour overs. No guesswork!

2. Place the filter in the Chemex, with the 3-layered (thicker) side of the filter facing the spout.

3. Rinse the filter with hot water just off a boil. This allows us to eliminate paper taste when brewing our coffee. (If you don't believe us, take a drink of the water that first passes through the filter. It is not good.) We're also preheating the Chemex brewer itself.

4. Discard hot water from the Chemex, and discard any excess water that may be retained under the filter. If you removed the filter to do this, carefully put it back in place now. Note: not everyone removes the filter when discarding the paper water. If you leave it in place, just be sure to remove as much water from the Chemex as possible.

5. In your pouring kettle, add at least 30 ounces of filtered water, heated to the optimal brewing temperature of 195 - 205° F. You can get water to this temperature by bringing it to a boil, and then letting it sit for 30 seconds to a minute. You may also use a thermometer.

6. Grind your coffee using a medium grind setting. It's best to grind recently roasted whole bean coffee, and to do this right before you brew, as you'll be using the freshest coffee possible.

7. Pour the coffee grounds into the Chemex's filter, and tap the Chemex, or gently shake back and forth to flatten out the grounds. This helps to remove air pockets and create a flat surface to work with.

8. Place the Chemex on the scale, and tare it out (zero out the scale). This will allow you to measure how much water you are adding during the brewing process.

9. When you're ready to begin, start your timer and begin pouring water over the coffee grounds. Wet all coffee grounds evenly, and then stop pouring. Use just enough water to fully saturate the grounds (Tony likes to use exactly 72 grams of water).

10. Watch the coffee bloom (degassing = bubbles) for about 30-45 seconds, after which the bubbles will stop forming. This is a great chance to take a sniff - it will smell wonderful.

11. After the bloom, slowly and continuously pour in small circles until you reach 272 grams on your scale (so add another 200 grams of water). 

12. Repeat this four times, in 100 gram increments. Add 100 grams of water each time, until you reach 672 grams of water.

13. Extraction should be complete after 4:15 to 4:45. If it took longer than 4:45, your grind was likely too fine. If extraction took much less than 4:15, your grind was too coarse. Adjust your settings and try again. (Don't be afraid to keep trying new and different variables).

14. Remove the filter and used grounds from the Chemex, remove the Chemex from the scale, and swirl it to ensure coffee integration.

15. Pour into your favorite mug and enjoy!

16. Discard or compost your used coffee grounds.

This was fun! Unlike most viral Internet videos, we DO encourage you to try this at home. Pick up a Chemex from our online store and start hand brewing your coffee! Or stop by one of our cafes and order a pour over.

Posted in Chemex, Chemex filter, hand brew, handbrew, pour over, pourover, Tony Auger

The Baked Maple Pumpkin Latte Has Landed!

Posted on August 28, 2014 by Chris Reimer

It's back! For a limited time, the Baked Maple Pumpkin Latte is ready to brighten your day. Our baristas make this latte with baked pumpkin, maple syrup, cinnamon syrup, whipped cream, and a little nutmeg on top. It's the real deal! 

 

Visit a Kaldi's Coffee cafe soon and try one.

 

Posted in Autumn, Baked Maple Pumpkin Latte, barista, pumpkin

Kaldi's Coffee Cafe Hours for Labor Day 2014

Posted on August 27, 2014 by Chris Reimer

Our cafes will have adjusted hours for the upcoming Labor Day holiday (Monday, September 1). Here's a rundown:

 

St Louis

Demun: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Crescent: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Kayak's: 7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Kirkwood: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Chesterfield: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Farrell: Closed

 

Columbia: 6:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

 

Kansas City

Main St: 7:00 a.m. - Noon

Briarcliff: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Zona Rosa: 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Country Club Plaza - Jefferson St: 7:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Country Club Plaza - 47th St: 7:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.

State Line: 7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

 

Have a wonderful holiday, everyone!

Kaldi's Guest Does the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge at Our Kirkwood Cafe

Posted on August 26, 2014 by Chris Reimer

As your Facebook feed has no doubt informed you, people across the world are doing the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Movie stars and ordinary people alike have been dumping icy water over their heads for a great cause - fundraising to find a cure for ALS.

At our Kirkwood cafe, one of our regular guests, Pattie, asked our lead barista John Shaw to assist her in rising to the challenge. He happily obliged. Thanks to Rick Forrestal for the photos!

 

Posted in #ALSIceBucketChallenge, ALS, ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, John Shaw, Kirkwood cafe

A Dog Named Kaldi

Posted on August 21, 2014 by Chris Reimer

We received a private message on Facebook from a Kaldi's fan named Katie. Seems she left St. Louis for Seattle, but didn't want to leave St. Louis too far behind.

 

"After moving to Seattle, we wanted to always have a piece of St. Louis with us ... so we named our dog Kaldi!"

 

Katie, thank you for sharing this with us! Best doggie ever!

Posted in Kaldi the dog, Seattle

Field Report: Kaldi's Visits Coffee Farms in Colombia

Posted on August 17, 2014 by Chris Reimer

We have two employees, Frank McGinty and Keith Kildron, on the ground in Colombia visiting coffee farms for a week. We're meeting with old friends, and working to find new farmers to work with, too. We're receiving photos and field reports from them, and thought we'd share the info with you. Here are their reports.

 

Wednesday, August 13

Hey guys! Just wanted to give you a quick update...we've had an incredible first day. No promises on further updates due to Wi-Fi, but we'll send what we can when we can! We'll try to upload some pix on Google Drive as they may be too large to send via WiFi.
 
- At 4:15 a.m., our group met up with Sebastian at out hotel, and we flew from Bogota to Neiva.

- From Neiva we drove/bussed a few hours to Timaná, where we met up with the AsproTimaná group. This impressive group of producers gave us a great presentation on their efforts to control quality and promote a sense of family within the group of 100 farmers (Sebastian did a great job translating!).

- After the presentation we cupped nine of their coffees at their lab, ranging from 83pts - 86.5pts ... a lot of the experimentation was based on wet and dry fermentation and at different times (24hrs/48hrs/72hrs) A couple of the coffees were complex and cupped very well.
 
- From the lab/office we piled into three jeeps/back of trucks to Robinson's farm/house (the President of the producers group AsproTimaná) The ride was incredible as we climbed the 1700-meter mountain. The highlight of the journey was the small open cable car/box we took from the end of the road to his home (see pix...it was insane!!)

 

 

- We were greeted with shots of Double Anise and a lunch that will live on my Top 10 dining experiences of all time (see pic of Chris & Keith).

- After a lunch of roast chicken from the farm, soup, rice and the most delicious avocados I've tasted, we hiked up the mountain to experience the coffee growing first-hand. Robinson's farm is a 13-hectare plot which sits at 1,700 meters, planted with both Caturra and Castillo varietals. Sebastian seemed very impressed with the operation and the quality focus of the farm!
 
- After more shots of Double Anise and coffee, we headed back down the mountain to a beautiful cafe owned by the farmers and the AsproTimana group.
 
I think that sums it up for today. We are posted up tonight and tomorrow at Hotel Kahve, which is owned by the Coocentral group here in Garzon. We have a presentation from them and a cupping in the morning, then touring a few of their farms in the afternoon. Hope all is well back home! Talk soon!
 
Thursday, August 14
Coocentral Co-Op in Garzon, Huila
 
- We're currently posted up at the beautiful Hotel Cambis in the town square of La Plata. Wi-Fi is somewhat spotty so hopefully this all goes trough. We'll try to upload more pix when possible.

- Presentation at  the very well organized co-op of Coocentral representing 4,000 farmers near Garzon. They support the famers/members with everything from technical farming services and support, to funeral services for the death of a producer.

- Later during the morning we cupped 22 different coffees from multiple producers in their "premium" program. All coffees were grown above 1,600m and Caturra and Castillo varietals. Most scored around 83pts ... there was an overwhelming acidity/astringency to the cups - possibly due to light roasting and the fact they were only picked 10-14 days prior (very fresh). The feedback to their Director of Quality Control was well received.

- The afternoon we bussed up the mountains (getting stuck only once!) to the farm of a female producer associated with the co-op. The farm had substantially improved infrastructure with multiple raised bed systems, a newer wet mill/de-pulper and an internal, organic fertilize station. Among the three hectares planted with 8,000 coffee plants, were plantain trees, sugar cane, yucca and orange trees.
 
- We finished the visit with a presentation of coffee desserts including candied coffee pulp/cascara, coffee flan, and salty cheese!

- Finished the day with arepa for dinner with late night shots of double anise.

Friday, August 15
La Plata

- Bussed 2hrs from Garzon to La Plata.

- Cupping at Sena (student learning center) with RACAFE team to calibrate. Met Elsy Causuya and her daughter. Tasted/cupped random coffees that Sena had been working with ... just to get calibrated for the competition
 
- Lunch then at a beautiful colonial hotel with the team at RACAFE.
 
- Visit to RACAFE's buying station/storage in La Plata. Once inventory reaches 5,000k they ship the coffee to Bogotá. Only coffee from Monserrate is in this place (40 farmers which are kept as separate lots).
 
- Afternoon of Round 1 & Round 2 competition cupping (16 coffees total) ranging from sub-80pts to over 87pts. Then on to handmade empanadas and cerveza at the hotel to wrap up the day.

Saturday, August 16
La Plata

- We are cupping another 24 coffees from different producers in the Monserrate competition today (40 total). Then tomorrow we are hopefully heading up the mountain to Monserrate. Sebastian said the road to town has been a little difficult to traverse lately, but he feels if we go up early in the morning and leave just after lunch we should be okay.
We'll try to send notes tonight ... Wi-Fi remains tough to catch.

Hope all is well back home!
Frank (& Keith)
 
Saturday, August 16 (continued)
La Plata

- Another incredible day in La Plata, Huila! After buñuelo (fried dough!!) at SuperPan (local bakery) we headed back Sena to cup the remaining 40 coffees from Monserrate (16 Friday & 24 Saturday morning). Coffees scored from 79 to 91 points.

- After lunch, we had the honor of cupping and ranking the top 10 producers of Monserrate! These were all incredible coffees ranging from 84 to 92 points, with at least five of the coffees receiving scores over 90!! All 10 judges (Kaldi's, Atlas, Cafe Grumpy, Irving Farms, Congo Initiative, Valentine Coffee, RACAFE) were very impressed and excited about what the town brought to the table.

- The evening consisted of empanadas, more Double Anise & smoky pork ribs on the mountain looking down on La Plata. We spent the rest of the night (and early hours of the morning) at a Salsa club trying to keep up with the locals!!! (Editor's note: where are the pics, Frank?)
(Editor's note - standing with Frank in the picture above is Oscar Medina himself!)

Sunday, August 17
La Plata

- After a late night of dancing, and another morning of buñuelo at SuperPan, we were excited for the announcement and celebration of the Top 10 producers of Monserrate.  A majority of the producers made it down to La Plata for the morning's festivities. The morning was followed by soccer vs the local kids (yes, we lost) and lunch of roasted suckling pork!! 

- Due to the fact that a car was set on fire Friday night by drug traffickers on the road to Monserrate, the celebration and soccer match were moved to La Plata. I guess we'll have to come back soon to see Monserrate!

Tonight we're back to Bogotá...with AC and hot water!
Frank & Keith
 
 
Monday, August 18
Bogota
 
- After making our way back to Bogota for one last day in Colombia, we had a full schedule of city sightseeing. We started the morning touring the dry mill of RACAFE, our exporter and host for the trip. It was incredible to see the volume of coffee they receive (140,000 bags per year), grade, sort, package, and export around the world.
 
Coffee at the mill ranged from "C-grade" coffee to some of the best coffees in the world (i.e. coffee from Monserrate that we graded). As of last week they had installed a completely separate mill/station for the specialty coffee they deal with (coffees cupping 80 points or higher). This was an enormous step in the right direction and to our knowledge the only one of its kind in Colombia. 
 
- After saying goodbyes to our travel partners, we spent the afternoon playing tourist in the city of over 7 million. The mix of old colonial architecture and new, modern growth was a gorgeous juxtaposition. As with the rest of the country, the people of Bogota were extremely hospitable ... and not to mention, as beautiful as the city itself! 
         
- The highlight of our tourist afternoon was taking the cable car tram up the 10,000ft mountain to a scenic overlook above the city ... also known as Monseratte. From here you could see the scope of the city's vast layout, as well as the mountains that surround it.
 
- After souvenir shopping for our kids, checking out the new (and only) Starbucks in Colombia and dinner at the Bogota Brewing Co., we made our way back to our hotel for an early night.
 
- It's great to be back in St. Louis, but as with most international travel experiences, there is always the reverse acclimation of getting back to our fast-paced, modern lifestyle here in the States. We are already missing the people, landscape, architecture, food, and culture of South America. We will always cherish this trip and I know we both hope to return to the beauty of Colombia soon!

Adios,
Frank & Keith

Posted in AsproTimana, buñuelo, coffee farms, Colombia, Colombia Monserrate, Congo Initiative, Coocentral, Coocentral Co-Op, double anise, Elcy Causaya, Garzon, Irving Farms, La Plata, Monserrate, RACAFE, raised drying beds, SuperPan, Top 10 Monserrate producers, visiting coffee farms

1 2 3 10 Next »

Recent Articles

Tags

About Us