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Bee House Pour Over Tutorial

Posted on October 06, 2014 by Chris Reimer

 

The Bee House is a Japanese pour over method that's perfect for home. It's easy to learn, and produces a sweet, clean cup of coffee.

Kiersten Little, barista at our Crescent cafe in Clayton, loves using the Bee House, and agreed to show us how it's done. Watch the video above, and follow along with the instructions below.

 

Supplies you'll need (click item to purchase from our online store):

24g coffee, medium-fine grind

Coffee grinder

Bee House dripper

Melitta #2 coffee filter

Gooseneck pouring kettle

Filtered water at optimal brewing temp of 195 - 205° F

Decanter large enough to brew into

Scale

Timer

 

Instructions:

1. Weigh out 24 grams of Kaldi's Coffee (substitute only in a pinch!). Don't be intimidated by the use of a scale - it actually helps you be more precise when making pour overs. No guesswork!

2. Fold the Melitta #2 filter along its bottom and side seams and place the filter in the Bee House. Then place the Bee House on top of the decanter.

3. Rinse the filter with hot water. This allows us to eliminate paper taste when brewing our coffee. (If you don't believe us, take a drink of the water that first passes through the filter.) We're also preheating the Bee House and the decanter.

4. Discard hot water from the decanter, and discard any excess water from the Bee House that may be retained under the filter.

5. Put at least 16 ounces of filtered water, heated to the optimal brewing temperature of 195 - 205° F, in your pouring kettle. You can get water to this temperature by bringing it to a boil, and then letting it sit for 30 seconds to a minute.

6. Grind your coffee using a medium-fine grind setting. It's best to grind recently roasted whole bean coffee, and to do this right before you brew, as you'll be using the freshest coffee possible.

7. Again place the Bee House on top of the decanter.

8. Pour the coffee grounds into the Bee House's filter, and tap the Bee House, or gently shake back and forth to flatten out the grounds. This helps to remove air pockets and create a flat surface to work with.

9. Place the Bee House and your decanter on the scale, and tare it out (zero out the scale). This will allow you to measure how much water you use during the brewing process.

10. If you're ready to begin, start your timer and begin pouring water over the coffee grounds. Wet all coffee grounds evenly, and then stop pouring. Use just enough water to fully saturate the grounds.

11. Watch the coffee bloom (degas - look for bubbles) for about 30-45 seconds, after which the bubbles will stop forming. This is a great chance to take a sniff - it will smell wonderful.

12. After the bloom, slowly and continuously pour in small circles until you reach 400 grams on your scale. Note that some baristas like to "pulse pour," or pour for 10-20 seconds, then stop to take a short break, before beginning to pour again. Kiersten doesn't do it this way, but try it both ways to see which pouring method works best for you.

13. Extraction should be complete after 2:30 to 3:00. If it took longer than 3:00, your grind was likely too fine. If extraction took much less time than this, your grind was too coarse. Adjust your settings and try again. (Don't be afraid to keep trying new and different variables).

14. Remove the Bee House from the decanter, and swirl the decanter to ensure coffee integration.

15. Pour into your favorite mug and enjoy!

16. Discard or compost your used coffee grounds.

 

Want to try this at home? Order a Bee House and filters from us and start hand brewing your coffee! 

Posted in Bee House, Bee House pour over, Bee House pourover, Beehouse, Crescent cafe, hand brew, handbrew, Kiersten Little, pour over, pourover

Kalita Wave Pour Over Tutorial

Posted on September 25, 2014 by Chris Reimer

 

The Kalita Wave is quickly becoming one of the most popular pour over coffee brewing methods, known for its beauty and its flat bottom, which allows for a more even extraction.

It just so happens to be the favorite brewing method of our own David Fasman, GM of Kayak's by Kaldi's Coffee. So we got together with him to show us how it's done. Watch the video above, and follow along with the instructions below.

 

Supplies you'll need:

24g coffee, medium grind

Coffee grinder

Kalita Wave dripper

Kalita filter

Gooseneck pouring kettle

Filtered water at optimal brewing temp of 195 - 205° F

Decanter large enough to brew into

Scale

Timer

 

Instructions:

1. Weigh out 24 grams of Kaldi's Coffee (substitute only in a pinch!). Don't be intimidated by the use of a scale - it actually helps you be more precise when making pour overs. No guesswork!

2. Place the filter in the Kalita Wave, and then place the Kalita Wave on top of the decanter.

3. Rinse the filter with hot water. This allows us to eliminate paper taste when brewing our coffee. (If you don't believe us, take a drink of the water that first passes through the filter.) We're also preheating the Kalita Wave and the decanter.

4. Discard hot water from the decanter, and discard any excess water from the Kalita that may be retained under the filter.

5. Put at least 16 ounces of filtered water, heated to the optimal brewing temperature of 195 - 205° F, in your pouring kettle. You can get water to this temperature by bringing it to a boil, and then letting it sit for 30 seconds to a minute.

6. Grind your coffee using a medium grind setting. It's best to grind recently roasted whole bean coffee, and to do this right before you brew, as you'll be using the freshest coffee possible.

7. Again place the Kalita Wave on top of the decanter.

8. Pour the coffee grounds into the Kalita Wave's filter, and tap the Wave, or gently shake back and forth to flatten out the grounds. This helps to remove air pockets and create a flat surface to work with.

9. Place the Kalita Wave and your decanter on the scale, and tare it out (zero out the scale). This will allow you to measure how much water you use during the brewing process.

10. If you're ready to begin, start your timer and begin pouring water over the coffee grounds. Wet all coffee grounds evenly, and then stop pouring. Use just enough water to fully saturate the grounds.

11. Watch the coffee bloom (bubbles) for about 30-45 seconds, after which the bubbles will stop forming. This is a great chance to take a sniff - it will smell wonderful.

12. After the bloom, slowly and continuously pour in small circles until you reach 400 grams on your scale. Note that some baristas like to "pulse pour," or pour for 10-20 seconds, then stop to take a short break, before beginning to pour again. David doesn't do it this way (and he explains why in the video), but try it both ways and see which pouring method works best for you.

13. Extraction should be complete after 2:30 to 3:00. If it took longer than 3:00, your grind was likely too fine. If extraction took much less time than this, your grind was too coarse. Adjust your settings and try again. (Don't be afraid to keep trying new and different variables).

14. Remove the Kalita Wave from the decanter, and swirl the decanter to ensure coffee integration.

15. Pour into your favorite mug and enjoy!

16. Discard or compost your used coffee grounds.

 

Want to try this at home? Order a Kalita Wave and filters from us and start hand brewing your coffee! 

Posted in David Fasman, hand brew, handbrew, Kalita wave, Kalita wave pour over tutorial, Kalita Wave tutorial, Kayak's, Kayak's by Kaldi's Coffee, pour over, pourover

Chemex Pour Over Tutorial

Posted on September 22, 2014 by Chris Reimer

The Chemex was invented back in 1941 by a German scientist named Peter Schlumbohm, and has changed very little since then. Often considered one of the best-designed products of modern times, you could even call it a work of art - a Chemex is on display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

What makes the Chemex different than other pour over methods? The coffee only comes in contact with the scientifically designed Chemex filters and non-porous glass, and the filter removes most of a coffee's oils. This yields a sediment-free, clean, bright-tasting cup of coffee.

Tony Auger, roaster and quality assurance technician at Kaldi's Coffee, loves brewing with the Chemex, so we asked him to meet us at our Demun cafe to show us how it's done. Watch the video above, and follow along with the instructions below.

 

Supplies you'll need (click item to purchase from our online store):

41g coffee, medium grind

Coffee grinder

Chemex

Chemex filter

Gooseneck pouring kettle

Filtered water at optimal brewing temp of 195 - 205° F

Scale

Timer

 

Instructions:

1. Weigh out 41 grams of Kaldi's Coffee (substitute only in a pinch!). Don't be intimidated by the use of a scale - it actually helps you be more precise when making pour overs. No guesswork!

2. Place the filter in the Chemex, with the 3-layered (thicker) side of the filter facing the spout.

3. Rinse the filter with hot water just off a boil. This allows us to eliminate paper taste when brewing our coffee. (If you don't believe us, take a drink of the water that first passes through the filter. It is not good.) We're also preheating the Chemex brewer itself.

4. Discard hot water from the Chemex, and discard any excess water that may be retained under the filter. If you removed the filter to do this, carefully put it back in place now. Note: not everyone removes the filter when discarding the paper water. If you leave it in place, just be sure to remove as much water from the Chemex as possible.

5. In your pouring kettle, add at least 30 ounces of filtered water, heated to the optimal brewing temperature of 195 - 205° F. You can get water to this temperature by bringing it to a boil, and then letting it sit for 30 seconds to a minute. You may also use a thermometer.

6. Grind your coffee using a medium grind setting. It's best to grind recently roasted whole bean coffee, and to do this right before you brew, as you'll be using the freshest coffee possible.

7. Pour the coffee grounds into the Chemex's filter, and tap the Chemex, or gently shake back and forth to flatten out the grounds. This helps to remove air pockets and create a flat surface to work with.

8. Place the Chemex on the scale, and tare it out (zero out the scale). This will allow you to measure how much water you are adding during the brewing process.

9. When you're ready to begin, start your timer and begin pouring water over the coffee grounds. Wet all coffee grounds evenly, and then stop pouring. Use just enough water to fully saturate the grounds (Tony likes to use exactly 72 grams of water).

10. Watch the coffee bloom (degassing = bubbles) for about 30-45 seconds, after which the bubbles will stop forming. This is a great chance to take a sniff - it will smell wonderful.

11. After the bloom, slowly and continuously pour in small circles until you reach 272 grams on your scale (so add another 200 grams of water). 

12. Repeat this four times, in 100 gram increments. Add 100 grams of water each time, until you reach 672 grams of water.

13. Extraction should be complete after 4:15 to 4:45. If it took longer than 4:45, your grind was likely too fine. If extraction took much less than 4:15, your grind was too coarse. Adjust your settings and try again. (Don't be afraid to keep trying new and different variables).

14. Remove the filter and used grounds from the Chemex, remove the Chemex from the scale, and swirl it to ensure coffee integration.

15. Pour into your favorite mug and enjoy!

16. Discard or compost your used coffee grounds.

This was fun! Unlike most viral Internet videos, we DO encourage you to try this at home. Pick up a Chemex from our online store and start hand brewing your coffee! Or stop by one of our cafes and order a pour over.

Posted in Chemex, Chemex filter, hand brew, handbrew, pour over, pourover, Tony Auger

The Baked Maple Pumpkin Latte Has Landed!

Posted on August 28, 2014 by Chris Reimer

It's back! For a limited time, the Baked Maple Pumpkin Latte is ready to brighten your day. Our baristas make this latte with baked pumpkin, maple syrup, cinnamon syrup, whipped cream, and a little nutmeg on top. It's the real deal! 

 

Visit a Kaldi's Coffee cafe soon and try one.

 

Posted in Autumn, Baked Maple Pumpkin Latte, barista, pumpkin

Kaldi's Coffee Cafe Hours for Labor Day 2014

Posted on August 27, 2014 by Chris Reimer

Our cafes will have adjusted hours for the upcoming Labor Day holiday (Monday, September 1). Here's a rundown:

 

St Louis

Demun: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Crescent: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Kayak's: 7:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Kirkwood: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Chesterfield: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Farrell: Closed

 

Columbia: 6:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

 

Kansas City

Main St: 7:00 a.m. - Noon

Briarcliff: 7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Zona Rosa: 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Country Club Plaza - Jefferson St: 7:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Country Club Plaza - 47th St: 7:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.

State Line: 7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

 

Have a wonderful holiday, everyone!

Kaldi's Guest Does the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge at Our Kirkwood Cafe

Posted on August 26, 2014 by Chris Reimer

As your Facebook feed has no doubt informed you, people across the world are doing the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Movie stars and ordinary people alike have been dumping icy water over their heads for a great cause - fundraising to find a cure for ALS.

At our Kirkwood cafe, one of our regular guests, Pattie, asked our lead barista John Shaw to assist her in rising to the challenge. He happily obliged. Thanks to Rick Forrestal for the photos!

 

Posted in #ALSIceBucketChallenge, ALS, ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, John Shaw, Kirkwood cafe

A Dog Named Kaldi

Posted on August 21, 2014 by Chris Reimer

We received a private message on Facebook from a Kaldi's fan named Katie. Seems she left St. Louis for Seattle, but didn't want to leave St. Louis too far behind.

 

"After moving to Seattle, we wanted to always have a piece of St. Louis with us ... so we named our dog Kaldi!"

 

Katie, thank you for sharing this with us! Best doggie ever!

Posted in Kaldi the dog, Seattle

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